About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
house listen to the principles themselves, the president speaker boehner talk about these issues, i would rather be here because this is where so much of the same conversation is going to be taking place, and i get the opportunity today to talk to many of those principles directly involved in those negotiations, what's going to play out of the next couple months. it's a critical time in the country's fiscal history right now, tough decisions to be made. and again, honored. glad somebody people are watching as well over the internet and elsewhere. so we are going to begin some additional conversations here right now. i'm going to be talking about with members of congress but also to erskine bowles and alan simpson there. will he talk with some top economist about some of the choices facing those policymakers, but right now we are joined by one of the principals in the conversation to take place over at the white house in just about an hour or so, and that is gene sperling, the director of the national economic council. so i will invite him out there on the stage. so if gene sperling
that nancy -- nancy pelosi and john boehner don't do that? [applause] >> they don't really socialize. one reason that joe might work together, i knew joe and i love him. i wouldn't do anything mean to joe. so that is a lot of it. the times have changed so much. in the senate, one of the problems as they got away from regular order. you send a bill to a committee. you have an oversight hearing, you have an amendment coming u-boat, you go to the full committee and the house and then you go to conference. but they wound up getting a transportation bill. it's a combination of things. modern technology, frankly it is a 24/7 news media. it is the fact that the members leave their families back home. you can't be a good legislator two and half days a week. you have to work at it. the combination of those things, it contributed to the partisanship and the gridlock that we have now. the answer is simple. it is called leadership. men and women of goodwill, conservative liberals, republicans, and the president -- they say it is an easy and we have to get results. >> so i want to come back to that. l
point -- that speaker boehner showed yesterday in his remarks. he basically said that the president won the election, and he should lead. he basically, he said that he was open to revenues. which is, which many in his own party disagree with. um, so i thought the tone was the right thing. now, you know, you can't expect the speaker to turn on a dime in 24 hours and embrace everything; higher taxes, higher taxes on the wealthy. but i think that privately he's seen the handwriting on the wall, and it makes me very hopeful that we can do something big in the next month and a half. it's a good first step. um, i would say two things, though, in relation to it. when you unpack the speaker's speech, there is a premise that doesn't quite work, and we're going to have to help him move others in the republican party away from it. it's called -- part of his speech he talked about dynamic scoring. this idea that if you cut taxes, you will increase revenues. well, it's about time we debunked that myth. it's a rumpelstiltskin fairy tale, dynamic scoring. if you may remember, rumpelstiltskin was the f
. the speaker of the house john boehner says that he backed away from an agreed compromise on raising the debt limit. an article in "the new york times" magazine tends to support that charge the reason he painted a picture of obama standing firm and the negotiations as the apparent requirement for the resolution of the legislation approaches the end as it appears that even more are being forecast for the next congress if it will take an unusually skillful second term president to deliver solutions to the financial problems facing the nation. if the task rests on the shoulders of barack obama will he emulate wells and who wouldn't compromise or would he like eisenhower? regan, clinton and washington figured out how to win against the odds. of course to achieve the accommodation in congress he would need a lyndon johnson, tip o'neill or new gingrich to lead the congress majority that would follow. so what specifically what i recommend that he would do to avoid the challenges of the second term? he should appoint an intermediary with the skills of simpson-bowles to work with the congress on a leg
hubbard, what boehner said, and i take from this collection some optimism in 20 # 13 the way it might play out is whether we go over or don't go over the fiscal cliff, you know, there's a lot to happen in the next three months, that we get to some space where if they did a trillion dollars of cuts and reforms to entitlements, a frl on discretionary, a trillion in new revenue, a trillion in saved interest only because the budget doesn't understand net present value, but that's okay, but if you did that, there's a grand bargain in a way that would be, i think, a pretty good accomplishment for both parties. i think that the principle thing in that is is can you gent a significant chunk of republicans in the house to support anything that has a trillion dollars of revenue in it. >> you think they reach a bargain, move quickly over the cliff. what happens to get to the bargain? >> yeah, sorry, i thought that's what you were asking. >> yeah. >> i'm pessimistic they will be able to sort out that bargain in the next two months so i'm afraid there's -- i think a serious danger, they go over the fis
. and then we need to deal with the longer-term issue next year. the groundwork is laid. president, john boehner, harry reid, and senator mcconnell -- you can't do in three and half weeks a half weeks what needs to be done. the next year is that moment of opportunity. and i think the work is being done and i think this will help get a result. >> when he does come back and say, i was disappointed when the president come after simpson-bowles, didn't really embrace it and i don't know that we would've adopted it, but it would have been the least possible. it is because the president has been reelected after a very tough campaign. the republicans have been upset by the results of the campaign and you have the raw personal material for this to work out to everyone's benefit. he is very much smart and very effective. >> inner has to get the votes. he calls for both it only gets a vote on his conference committee has problems of his own. .. >> maybe the world economy would collapse if we didn't deal with it, it was taken tonight house of representatives r and it was defeated, and they timely got it pas
the bottleneck now. um, you probably saw the article this morning from hubbard, you saw what boehner said. i take from this collection some optimism that in 2013 the way it might play out is whether we go over, don't go over the fiscal cliff, you know, there's a lot to happen in the next three months that we get to some space where if they did a trillion dollars of cuts and reforms of entitlements, a trillion dollars on discretionary, a trillion of new revenue and a trillion of saved interest which is only because the budget doesn't understand the present value, but, you know, that's okay, if you did that, you basically could sort out a grand bargain in a way that would be, i think, a pretty good accomplishment for both parties. but i think the principal thing in that is can you get a significant chunk of republicans in the house to support anything that's got a trillion dollars of revenue in it. >> so you think they reach a bargain. you kind of moved quickly over the cliff, what happens to get to that bargain? >> yeah, sorry, i thought that's what you were asking is. i'm somewhat pessimistic the
. john boehner still in the house for the time being at the treasury. the president is back in the white house and harry reid is in the senate with a few more seats. why should i believe this would end any more positively than the summer of 2011? >> because again i'm not going to try to talk to you in optimism but let's look at what's changed. you have republican leadership acknowledging for the first time in this debate in public that it's agreed to increase in revenues as part of an agreement that helps restore fiscal balance. that's a very important change. you can debate on what motivated that change, and of course it's true that approach has been a popular very substantial support among the american people. you have a much greater recognition that the economy would benefit on a carefully designed balanced agreement on fiscal reform and putting it off indefinitely is not good for the country. that's important, too. and i also think again if you listen carefully to what people are saying and what many politicians are saying with many elected representatives are saying there's a lot of
. think there's a possibility on grand bargain issues or is it more likely it will do the job boehner down payment and then set up a process? >> i don't have the answer. my hope is to establish a confidence of the american people that people are thinking it out the best interests of the country, not the short-term political interest is the members or their parties. that's the best thing we can do? in the long run, we're going to fix all these problems because people are going to quit loaning us money. we are going to fix them. the question is how much pain do we go through before refix them and how much straight to the american people have as a result of this delay in the solution for these problems? in now, as a young person today, if you have any knowledge about what's going on in washington and the effect be seriously concerned about your future in terms of your economic future, in terms of your freedom. when the young generation comes into a couple of disappointment, when expectations they thought were there or not there and won't be there in the cities now, you are going to see some a
a guy before i worked for romney i worked for boehner in the majority leader officer, i called up the digital guy tell me about twitter. how it's going work. he said you don't need to know it. it's not a big thing. here we're now, i notice during the campaign so much of what we did was driven from the bottom up through twitter. and -- even when i was on the plane. we would do the different gaggle. she would do it on a bigger plane. air force one. we call pear force one. i would got back of the plane and gaggle for fifteen or twint minutes. by the time i would come back i would come back on twitter and say it made news. >> people responded and taked you on twitter. >> when you say people you don't mean people you mean reporters. >> or people. [laughter] reporters are not people. >> that was on the free to be you and me. the reporters are people. but you mean this was the kind of back stage conversation you were watching playout on twitter? sometimes real people. it was more important how the journalist were using twitter. >> yeah. it became a incredible news. you could see the jour
it off track when there were in fact very close. i think boehner has been very clear. i think revenues are on the table. they are at the moment drawing a line on tax rates, but we will see where that goes. the last time, you are right, didn't work and we were not facing quite the same set of circumstances we are facing today so i'm cautiously optimistic although i will offer to say lastly that people sometimes say okay, it looks like simpson-bowles, everything in between zero and $4 trillion we could end up with all kinds of outcomes that may be less than i would like and maybe less than all of you would like but at least something. i'm hoping it is more over here but i don't know. >> and steve, so we are gathered here to talk about u.s. global competitiveness. how important is resolving these issues to the american position on the global economy? >> first of all i think it's important not just our position in the global comment about our position in the world. admiral mullen who was the previous chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said our greatest national security threat was our f
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11